Case 31: Christchurch House of Horrors (PART I)

CHRISTCHURCH. CANTERBURY. Within the eastern suburbs of Christchurch, on the South Island of New Zealand, you will find Aranui. Originally called Flemington (after one time resident of the area Jubal Fleming), Aranui (a Māori word meaning great path) was officially established in 1912.

Found in the middle of Aranui is Hampshire Street, dubbed by many “the worst street in Christchurch”. During the 1990s, Hampshire Street was infamous for many instances of violent crime including a 13-year-old boy who was shot by his best friend, a fish and chips shop being firebombed and many occurrences of teenagers being stabbed.

In the 2000s, Hampshire Street improved its standing in Aranui, mostly with the help of the Aranui Community Trust and a Labour government that helped revitalise state housing areas. However, Hampshire Street still saw its fair share of violent crime. 

Of those crimes, none are more infamous than the depravity that took place in the house on the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road, between the years 2008 and 2009. The debaucherous, degenerate and depraved crimes shocked, not only the residents of Aranui, or the citizens of New Zealand but the world at large. 

This is the tale of that wickedness, an account of the folk that frequented the house at the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road, the story of the building that forever became known as The Christchurch House of Horrors.

Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.

Hosted by Jessica Rust

Written and edited by Sirius Rust

Music sourced from:

Day of Chaos” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
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“Despair and Triumph” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
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“Night Break” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
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“Come Play with Me” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
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“Trio for Piano, Cello, and Clarinet” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
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“Infados” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
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“Lightless Dawn” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
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“Bittersweet” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
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“Sorry, I Meant to Say That You Are Eating A CheeseburgerDivider Line (https://archive.org/details/divider-lines-music-for-films)
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The podcast version is the intended way to consume this story but we make a transcript available for those that would rather read instead. This can be found below.

Case 31: Christchurch House of Horrors (PART I)

PROLOGUE: THE WORST STREET IN CHRISTCHURCH

ARANUI

Within the eastern suburbs of Christchurch, on the South Island of New Zealand, you will find Aranui. Originally called Flemington (after one time resident of the area Jubal Fleming), Aranui (a Māori word meaning great path) was officially established in 1912.

Aranui, which became colloquially known as A-Town by the roughly 4,500 people who call it home, covers an area of 1.42km² and borders three other suburbs, New Brighton to the northeast, Wainoni to the west and Bromley to the south.

A-Town is one of Christchurch’s lower socio-economic areas. The median income of the people in the area is $18,000 and ranks at 10 on the deprivation index,  the lowest rating (the deprivation index measures an area’s level of deprivation regarding relevant information such as income, employment, communication, transport, housing, education, and demographics).

However, folk in A-Town try to make the best of a tough situation. Jamie Roberts who runs the A-Town Boxing Gym told the Star News on the 26th of April 2021 for the article ‘Christchurch’s most deprived areas revealed in new socio-economic data’ that he tries to help people from challenging backgrounds get on their feet, “I think there are a lot of opportunities out there for people that want them – a lot of different support groups, a lot of different help groups… Whether it’s through sport or church, you know, I think there are a lot of places to go, a lot of things to do if you want to get off your butt and do something.”

CRIME ON HAMPSHIRE STREET

Found in the middle of Aranui is Hampshire Street, dubbed by many “the worst street in Christchurch”. During the 1990s, Hampshire Street was infamous for many instances of violent crime including a 13-year-old boy who was shot by his best friend, a fish and chips shop being firebombed and many occurrences of teenagers being stabbed.

In the 2000s, Hampshire Street improved its standing in Aranui, mostly with the help of the Aranui Community Trust and a Labour government that helped revitalise state housing areas.

However, Hampshire Street still saw its fair share of violent crime. Of those crimes, none are more infamous than the depravity that took place in the house on the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road, between the years 2008 and 2009. The debaucherous, degenerate and depraved crimes shocked, not only the residents of Aranui, or the citizens of New Zealand but the world at large. 

This is the tale of that wickedness, an account of the folk that frequented the house at the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road, the story of the building that forever became known as The Christchurch House of Horrors.

CHAPTER I: A VERY QUIET PERSON

EARLY LIFE: JASON SOMERVILLE 

Jason Paul Somerville was born on the 20th of January 1976 in Christchurch. The first of four children to Graeme and Rosemary Somerville. The family raised their children on Tomrich Street in the Christchurch suburb of Aranui. 

However, this union did not last and Graeme and Rosemary divorced in 1989 when Jason was 13 years old. Jason moved with his mother and other siblings to Taupo to be closer to Rosemary’s parents. Rosemary became heavily involved with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or Mormon Church during this time which helped her ‘find her footing’ in the new location. However, the family still struggled financially. 

In Taupo, Jason Somerville attended Taupo Intermediate before moving on to Taupo Nui-A-Tia College. Jason Somerville struggled at school, he was illiterate and was viewed as ‘slow’ by other school children. His mother Rosemary had issues with mental illness and was also seen as ‘simple’ by other people. This led to Jason being teased and bullied by other school kids during his time in Taupo. Jason would sometimes react violently to these instances of bullying, this is evidenced by the 30th of January 2010 article by The Press newspaper dubbed ‘A tale of poverty, bullying and anger’, in which a fellow female student described one incident of such violence, “I’m not proud of it, but I used to tease him. Everyone did. One day in the senior common room he grabbed me by the throat and pushed me up against a wall. It took five guys to get him off”.

Jason Somerville had other trauma around this time. He had suffered a traumatic brain injury (although the exact details of the incident are unknown publicly). He also developed epilepsy, possibly his epilepsy was a side effect of the head injury as that is one known cause of the disorder. 

Also around this time, Jason Somerville suffered sexual abuse. Again, the exact details of the incident (or incidents) are unknown publicly, but we know that the abuse happened sometime during his teenage years and greatly attributed to his mental distress.

It is also known that Jason went through, what was dubbed, a ‘peeping tom’ phase. Where he would spy on his neighbours with binoculars, sometimes catching them undressing.

Jason Somerville left school sometime in the early 1990s, he did a few odd jobs but primarily his income came from the unemployment benefit. 

However, in 1995, he was making enough cash to purchase a section of property on Scannell Street, approximately 1 km from central Taupo where he remained for the rest of the 1990s.

NEW MILLENIUM

Details on Jason Somerville’s life from the years 2000 to 2003 are publicly unknown, other than police receiving complaints of Jason stalking women around the Huka Falls area of Taupo in 2002.

However, on the 5th of October 2019, True Crime NZ received an email from a listener of the podcast that detailed their experiences with Jason Somerville when they were in their teenage years.

Please note, that the listener has wished to remain anonymous and this email was been edited for clarity and privacy reasons, certain names have been omitted to protect the innocent:

Jason owned a house on the corner of Scannell Street and Tonga Street. My brother owned the house three doors down roughly from there and my friends used to squat in Jason’s corner house with his brother. We were always warned that Jason was a bit funny with younger boys and to stay away from him by his brother.

[Jason] didn’t come by too often. I met his mother a few times too, she was definitely unwell. [His brother] was the ‘normal one’, he even held a job at one point. But most of the people hanging around this place we were all high school dropouts. I was sixteen when I was there. So this is circa 2001-2003. I’d describe Jason as a very quiet person. Even when drinking. [He] didn’t come across as stupid, was quite smart about his conversation points. He was very complimentary. The whole family, him, his brother and his mother were all very soft-spoken.

I would go over there every day. Jason had a room of his own for when he stayed at that house. We all thought it was strange he had his own room, it was just a bed.

Jason never expected anyone to pay rent, I think he liked the idea of all these young people in his house. No one picked on him, he was just accepted even though we were all weary of this older man (Jason would have been between 25 and 27 years old during this time), but no one complained because they were all living there for free.

It was parties every day. On whatever we could smoke, drink, inhale. One day we were partying [and there] was a fair group of us [at the house]. Jason said, he had some pills for us to try. It was Epilim. A strong mood stabilizer and anti-epileptic medication.

He told six of my friends they would get us high. I declined to take any. My friends crushed the pills and snorted them, when Jason wasn’t looking, my boyfriend at the time took more.

All six of those friends ended up in the hospital, they all had to use the defibrillator on them as they had overdosed (alcohol was involved also). Jason, me and my boyfriend at the time were the only ones who stayed back at this house, the rest had all gone to Rotorua (a 45-minute drive) and had ended up in the hospital there.

At some point in the night my boyfriend was overdosing, I knew it because his pupils had swelled up and were bulging out of his skull. He collapsed like a plank and broke his nose. I ran back to my brother’s house and grabbed my parent’s cell phone (we were living there at the time because my family were building a house elsewhere). Jason tried to convince me that my [boyfriend] would be fine. I told him I know he is dying, [and] he tried desperately to convince me that this was normal. Thinking back, I wondered if I had listened to Jason what would [have] happened.

I called an ambulance and went to the hospital with my boyfriend. The police came to interview him, it was bizarre because he was basically incoherent. I tried to tell them that Jason had given these pills to him and not just him but my other friends and that I was worried about them. They told me to leave and wouldn’t interview me further. I got a taxi home that night.

I never saw Jason again from memory.

About a month later, the police did a drug raid on [Jason’s] house. [I was there, as well as] my boyfriend and two other friends. The police turned up in mufti (plain or ordinary) cars and had a warrant [to search] for LSD (Lysergic acid diethylamide, better known as the street name Acid). I was just a couple of weeks shy of my 17th birthday. They stripped searched my girlfriend and me. We tried to tell them that they needed to ask Jason, we were trying to tell them, that this is why they had this warrant because my friends had all overdosed and were brought back to life with defibrillators! They didn’t want to hear a word of it. After that my boyfriend and our friends were homeless, and we kinda drifted apart after that.

I eventually drifted away from that scene and moved to Auckland.

I don’t know if this information is trivial, but it never sat well with me that so many people knew that Jason was quite unwell, that he had basically handed out prescription meds like candy to my friends and they could have died. That I was alone in the house with him and he basically tried to tell me my boyfriend was okay when he was clearly dying. Getting drug busted at age 16 and searched without parental consent or anything.

I really wish the police listened to me, they wouldn’t have a bar of it. At this point, I am sure he was known to the police. They must have known he owned that house and there were young people there but they didn’t protect any of us or do anything about the situation.

CHAPTER II: THEY WERE HAPPY TOGETHER

MARRIAGE

Jason and his family eventually switched from the Mormon Church to the Taupo Baptist Church. With no close friends, Jason was heavily involved with the church and it was his primary source of social contact. 

At Taupo Baptist Church, Jason Somerville met a woman by the name of Rebecca Sara Chamberlain. They began a relationship sometime in the early 2000s, Rebecca had a young son at this time from a previous relationship, so Jason became the defacto stepfather. 

The couple married in 2003 at the Taupo Baptist Church, and the family lived at the Scannell Street property. Jason got a job stacking trolleys at the local Pak ‘n’ Save and Rebecca did cleaning work at Mcdonald’s to pay the bills. They also both delivered pamphlets.

Over the next couple of years, the twosome added more members to the household, two daughters.

Sometime in either 2004 or 2005, the family sold the Scannell Street property and downsized to a smaller flat to help ease their financial strain. The purchaser of the Scannell Street property told the Sunday Star Times on the 13th of September 2009 for the article ‘He was always jittery. An anxious person’ that the house was filth encrusted with walls and doors looking like they had been kicked in or hit with a hammer, she also told the newspaper that there were animal faeces on the carpet.

It would seem that Jason Somerville was not the most affectionate partner or father, this is evidenced by the 30th of January 2010 article by The Press newspaper anointed ‘A tale of poverty, bullying and anger’, in which a neighbour of Jason described how he overheard Somerville speak to his wife and kids, He was a bloody mongrel… I heard him one day yelling abuse at his kids, I wouldn’t speak to my dogs like that, and I told him if I heard him speak like that again, I would drop him on the spot. He treated his wife and kids like shit… She seemed petrified of him. He seemed in complete control over her – big mouth, no guts”.

In either 2005 or 2006, Child, Youth and Family (now called Oranga Tamariki, or Ministry for Children) removed all three of Jason and Rebecca’s children from their care. 

Details are not publicly known for the exact reason why this happened. There is some speculation of physical abuse from Jason to the oldest child, including hearsay that Jason may have hanged the oldest child from a shower rail. Perhaps it was the couple’s substance abuse issues, as the twosome would both seek help in the coming years for addiction to alcohol. Whatever the reason, the three children were removed from the Somerville’s care and placed in the custody of families within the Taupo Baptist Church community.

CHRISTCHURCH

In either late 2006 or early 2007, Jason and his wife Rebecca moved to Christchurch to be closer to Jason’s family. They purchased a property at the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road in the suburb of Aranui.

While in Christchurch, Jason renewed contact with his father (who was now a farmer) and began doing some labour on his father’s farm. Jason also began a carpentry course at the Christchurch Polytechnic. With the free time he had, Somerville spent his days completing renovations on their house.

During this time, Child, Youth and Family (CYF) informed the couple that they would not be reunited with their children. Rebecca Chamberlain’s substance issues, alcohol and painkiller addiction, only worsened with this news. She even began self-harming, and cutting herself which resulted in trips to emergency psychiatric care. However, Rebecca sort help for these issues and began treatment. She eventually got sober and stopped self-harming.

The two were still reportedly trying to get their children back. While in the Garden City, the couple worked with a Family Court advocate, Peter Burns, who was attempting to help them get their two daughters and son back. Peter told the Sunday Star Times on the 13th of September 2009 for the article ‘He was always jittery. An anxious person’ that Jason was always ‘rather odd’ but he took quite a shine to Rebecca, “There were 10 applications we had before the court [regarding custody] and she wrote them all. They were just brilliant – you would think that a lawyer wrote them. She was very intelligent. She had cleaned herself up and just wanted to be a mum… She had battled through a rough patch and come out the other side… [Jason] was the voice [in the relationship] and [Rebecca] was very quiet. He was a wee bit overpowering at times”.

The couple attended the Linwood Baptist Church where Jason’s aunt, Jillian Somerville, was a pastor. Jillian told the Sunday Star Times for the same article, They were happy together. You would often see them walking [a]round the streets. They would be holding hands.”

BACK TO TAUPO

Sometime in either late 2007 or early 2008, Jason and Rebecca returned to Taupo in an effort to get their children back. Rebecca got her job back at Mcdonald’s and Jason delivered pamphlets to pay the bills.

The twosome rented a property on Rawhiti Street, the street adjacent to their old house on Scannell Street. A neighbour of the couple told the Sunday Star Times for the article ‘He was always jittery. An anxious person’ that during this time the property was filthy and fell into disarray, he also didn’t care much for Somerville, “Jason was on edge, very suspicious, and behaved strangely, I didn’t want to have much to do with him”.

While in Taupo, Jason Somerville rented the property on the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road in A-town to a couple, Shanita Araipu and Jason Hall. Shanita described the state of the house when they moved in to the Herald on Sunday on the 6th of September 2009, “Every single room had damage. There were holes in the walls and none of the doors had door handles – except the cupboard where the manhole is… There were bloodstains on the ground – they were covered with rubbish. There was a lot of blood on one of the bedroom floors – and spattered on door frames.” When Shanita asked Jason about the blood, he said it was from his dog.

During their time in Taupo, Jason and Rebecca tried desperately to get their kids back but all attempts were unsuccessful. Sometime in 2008, after somewhere between six and twelve months of residing in Taupo, Jason and Rebecca returned to Christchurch and moved back into their property at the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road in the suburb of Aranui; where they remained for the rest of 2008.

CHAPTER III: AN OUTGOING, LOVEABLE PERSON

TISHA LOWRY

Thursday. 25th of September 2008. 11 am. 28-year-old Tisha Lowry leaves The Bower Tavern in the Christchurch suburb of New Brighton wearing a Chicago Bulls jacket and jeans after spending time there with her grandfather. 

She begins to walk to her grandfather’s house on Hampshire Street in the Christchurch suburb of Aranui, where she had been calling home for some time; a 400m journey southwest. Tisha was living with her grandfather reportedly to “have a little bit of space” from her 48-year-old boyfriend.

Tisha crossed the Avon River and into the suburb of Aranui. She continued along Wainoni Road and made her way onto Hampshire Street.

However, Tisha was not at the property when her grandfather came home later that day. Stranger still, her handbag and cellphone were still at the house.

The next day, Friday the 26th of September 2008, was her grandfather’s birthday but Tisha did not attend the gathering. Something her mother Tanya Lowry thought was quite concerning. Nevertheless, it would seem that her family believed Tisha was spending time with her boyfriend.

On Saturday the 27th of September 2008, the family was contacted by Tisha’s boyfriend who informed them he had not seen or heard from her since Thursday. Nobody had. Tisha’s family contacted the police and reported her as a missing person.

POLICE INVESTIGATION

On the 2nd of October 2008, one week after Tisha Lowry went missing, Police conducted a scene examination of Tisha’s grandfather’s house on Hampshire Street. Detective Senior Sergeant (DSS) Virginia Le Bas appealed to the public in an official police statement, “We would like as much information as we can get, especially any sightings of Tisha. As time goes on we become increasingly concerned for her safety.

On the 7th of October 2008, Police dive teams searched the Avon River for any sign of Tisha Lowry. They found nothing. They also distributed 1,200 flyers about Tisha’s disappearance to drivers along Wainoni Road appealing for any information.

That same day, Tisha’s sister Leanne, on behalf of her family, released a statement through the police. It read:

Tisha Lowry is my older sister. She is an outgoing, loveable person. Tisha has lived a very full life, touching many along the way. Tisha is a very family-oriented person. She has strong bonds with my mother Tanya, and her grandfather Harry, Jacob my younger brother, and Nathan my older brother. Along with my Dad Trevor, we are all very worried about Tisha. Her disappearance is ripping the heart out of all who know and love her. We want nothing more than to have her home again, back with the family where she belongs.

If there is any person that has any information whatsoever, no matter how insignificant they think it may be, we the family, implore you to contact the Police.

Leanne, her sister

Two days later, on the 9th of October 2008, DSS Virginia Le Bas informed the public that the inquiry team is at approx. 35 officers and they are continuing to search for Tisha. In an official police statement, DSS Le Bas said that they have ruled out the alleged recent sighting of Tisha and, “We have staff at the Bower Tavern today speaking to persons there who may have been at the Hotel two weeks ago when Tisha is known to have been there with her Grandfather… We have also searched the Avondale Golf Club this morning but this revealed nothing. We are still looking for answers.”

Throughout 2008, the search for answers continued with no breakthroughs. Eight months later, on the 11th of June 2009, the police released a statement that there was now a reward for any information on the whereabouts of Tisha Lowry, “NZ Police are offering ‘a reward up to $20,000 for any material information or evidence which establishes the location of Tisha Lowry or her body or leads to the conviction of any person or persons responsible for the disappearance or death of Tisha Lowry.’”

This statement was released alongside a quote of DSS Virginia Le Bas pleading to the public for information, “Tisha was last seen on Sunday 25 September 2008 after she had been to a local hotel with her grandfather… She has never been seen again. People do not usually disappear by themselves; someone has the key.

END OF PART I

SOURCES

PROLOGUE:

Articles
Otago Daily Times, Christchurch’s most deprived areas revealed in new socio-economic data, https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-christchurch/christchurchs-most-deprived-areas-revealed-new-socio-economic-data
Stuff.co.nz, Setbacks slow Aranui’s road to recovery, https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/7992714/Setbacks-slow-Aranuis-road-to-recovery
Wikipedia, Aranui, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aranui
Stuff.co.nz, Welcome to A-town: A connected community in Christchurch’s second poorest suburb, https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/87352604/welcome-to-atown-a-connected-community-in-christchurchs-second-poorest-suburb

Documents
Government, Community profile – November 2014 Aranui/Wainoni/Bexley, https://www.ccc.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Culture-Community/Stats-and-facts-on-Christchurch/CommunityProfile-BurwoodPegasus-AranuiWaioniBexley.pdf

CHAPTER I:

Articles
NZ Herald, House of Horrors killer shows no remorse, https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/house-of-horrors-killer-shows-no-remorse/ZJAN33NVWIK7T
PI7S232SPUBNQ/
NZ Herald, ‘House of Horrors’ transcript – a lurid tale of death and sex, https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/house-of-horrors-transcript-a-lurid-tale-of-death-and-sex/YHHLLIUMVNDKUL5GVFW24T3I5Y/
Stuff.co.nz, ‘House of Horrors’ shocks country, http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/2858922/House-of-Horrors-shocks-country?rm=m

Documents
NZLII, R v Somerville HC CHCH CRI 2009 009 14005 [2010] NZHC 2 (29 January 2010), http://www.nzlii.org/nz/cases/NZHC/2010/2.html

Newspapers
The Press, A tale of poverty, bullying and anger, January 30 2010, Page A20
Sunday Star Times, He was always jittery, An anxious person, 13 September 2009, Page A7
Herald on Sunday, House of Horrors, 1 September 2019, Pages 27-29

CHAPTER II:

Articles
NZ Herald, House of Horrors killer shows no remorse, https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/house-of-horrors-killer-shows-no-remorse/ZJAN33NVWIK7T
PI7S232SPUBNQ/
NZ Herald, ‘House of Horrors’ transcript – a lurid tale of death and sex, https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/house-of-horrors-transcript-a-lurid-tale-of-death-and-sex/YHHLLIUMVNDKUL5GVFW24T3I5Y/
Stuff.co.nz, ‘House of Horrors’ shocks country, http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/2858922/House-of-Horrors-shocks-country?rm=m
NZ Herald, Inside Christchurch’s house of horrors, https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/inside-christchurchs-house-of-horrors/XQMFATASM4GHYP34DH2WF4K35U/

Documents
NZLII, R v Somerville HC CHCH CRI 2009 009 14005 [2010] NZHC 2 (29 January 2010), http://www.nzlii.org/nz/cases/NZHC/2010/2.html

Newspapers
The Press, A tale of poverty, bullying and anger, January 30 2010, Page A20
Sunday Star Times, He was always jittery, An anxious person, 13 September 2009, Page A7
Herald on Sunday, House of Horrors, 1 September 2019, Pages 27-29

CHAPTER III:

Articles
Scoop, Tisha Lowry: Family Plea For Information, https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK0810/S00091/tisha-lowry-family-plea-for-information.htm
NZ Police, Search for Tisha Lowry, https://www.police.govt.nz/news/release/4369?nondesktop
NZ Police, Search for Tisha two weeks on, https://www.police.govt.nz/news/release/4398?nondesktop
NZ Police, $20,000 Reward re Tisha Lowry, missing person, https://www.police.govt.nz/news/release/5174?nondesktop
NZ Herald, Mother fears worst for daughter missing after bar visit, https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/mother-fears-worst-for-daughter-missing-after-bar-visit/LJWKP2TMIRGK2RO5DWOYLBM73Y/
Otago Daily Times, Foul play considered in woman’s disappearance, https://www.odt.co.nz/news/national/foul-play-considered-womans-disappearance

Documents
NZLII, R v Somerville HC CHCH CRI 2009 009 14005 [2010] NZHC 2 (29 January 2010), http://www.nzlii.org/nz/cases/NZHC/2010/2.html

Newspapers
The Press, A tale of poverty, bullying and anger, January 30 2010, Page A20

3 thoughts on “Case 31: Christchurch House of Horrors (PART I)

  1. Your show is the best new zealand podcast on true crime, Bryan Bruce the invesagator is the best new zealand crime show over all but he has a whole team from camera man producer etc and he interviews all sorts of people involved in cases. Anyway what Im saying is your show is well researched and professionally recorded up to a high standard. all the best Chef

    Like

  2. Great podcast guys, thank you very much. I was quite interested in hearing this one as I had heard of the house but left NZ in 2008 so missed most of the fallout over it. I’m originally from CHCH, and went to school and worked in Aranui so I know the area and it’s inhabitants very well, some of it is pretty rough. Even so, this isn’t something you’d expect of any neighborhood. Thanks again for all your hard work!!

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